The UTSU should listen, know when to stand its ground

Resolving recent board meeting disputes requires communication and principled decision making

The UTSU should listen, know when to stand its ground

On April 29, 2017, members of the University of Toronto Students’ Union (UTSU) 2017-2018 Board of Directors were welcomed into their new roles with protest. At the board’s transition meeting, members of the Black Liberation Collective (BLC), alongside supporters of CUPE 1281 and the ‘Save our Services, Support our Staff’ campaign, protested the UTSU’s ongoing lawsuit against Sandra Hudson, former UTSU Executive Director and co-founder of Black Lives Matter Toronto (BLMTO). 

The BLC claims that the UTSU’s continuation of the lawsuit against Hudson perpetuates anti-Black racism and that the ongoing legal proceedings have inflicted serious harm on Hudson’s public image.

In the midst of this conflict, the UTSU must take a balanced approach to dealing with the unrest it currently faces. Such a balance requires cooperating with and listening to disgruntled students while simultaneously taking a principled stance that protects students’ interests.

The magnitude of students’ dissatisfaction can be attributed to the UTSU’s past ineffectiveness at listening to and collaborating with dissenting voices. Board meetings have been held during times that were inviable for many students, while other meetings have prohibited livestreams, preventing students who could not attend from seeing the events that transpired. In November of 2016, the UTSU hosted a poorly-publicized Anti-Black Racism Town Hall, which Black students did not attend, drawing criticism from the BLC.

The BLC is not the only group to critique the union lately, either. Supporters of CUPE 1282 and the ‘Save our services, Support our staff’ campaign have also been highly critical of the UTSU over proposed cuts to services. These groups have substantial strength in numbers and the potential to influence newer members of the UTSU board.

As these groups gain strength, it is in the best interest of the UTSU to listen to them.

The UTSU must foster an ongoing dialogue between the union and its members, and any issues that arise should be addressed properly and in a timely manner.

Regarding what transpired at the transition meeting, it is encouraging that UTSU President Mathias Memmel — after voting to give speaking rights to everyone in the room — encouraged the board to listen to the protesters that were speaking. Although the protesters mocked him for this, it was a necessary step in trying to bridge the divide between the opposing groups. Suppressing dissenting speech only gives more ammunition to those trying to oppose you.

However, while the UTSU must listen to these groups, it must also stick to its principles and prioritize the best interests of students. Being open to dissenting views and taking strong stances are certainly not mutually exclusive, but it is still important to recognize that sometimes there is nothing you can do about disagreement.

It is difficult for the union to compromise with the #ImWithSandy campaign given that the campaigns primary goal is for the union to drop the lawsuit. What the UTSU should do instead is work to better define and communicate the reasoning behind the lawsuit, ensuring that it is transparent in its motive in order to gain further support and traction. Communication is key, and the actions taken by Memmel at the board meeting are only a first step. The UTSU must present the facts of the case to the student body and do so without engaging in the character assassination of Hudson — a method achievable by separating the good that Hudson has done within student life circles and BLMTO from the allegations of financial fraud that have been made against her.

Moreover, the UTSU can effectively foster dialogue with Black students by reaching out to other organizations and student groups on campus like the Black Students Association and the Black Ties Association.

Communication is just as important internally as externally; individual UTSU board members should not feel pressured into adopting certain political positions or stances, and should act and engage in conversation in a manner that is congruent with their roles as student representatives.

The problems that the UTSU will face in the coming year are not going to be easy to solve — but by keeping a line of communication open while sticking to its principles, the union can save itself from further unrest.


Haseeb Hassaan is an incoming fourth-year student at St. Michael’s College studying Political Science. He is a former Associate Executive Vice-President of the UTSU, and a current Arts and Science Students’ Union executive. The views expressed here are his own.

Protests erupt after UTSU board meeting

CUPE 1281 members, supporters protest reduction in services provided by two staff positions

Protests erupt after UTSU board meeting

Protests broke out at the University of Toronto Students’ Union (UTSU) Board of Directors meeting following a vote to approve the minutes of the Services Committee which had decided to reduce the services provided by the Health and Dental Coordinator and the Clubs and Service Groups Coordinator.

The motion that was passed at the Services Committee states that the UTSU would “cease to offer the services of a designated member of the full-time staff to recognized clubs and service groups” and “cease to offer the services of a designated member of the full-time staff to students seeking assistance with the Health and Dental Plan.”  

The Health and Dental Coordinator and the Clubs and Service Groups Coordinator are represented by CUPE 1281, like most full-time staff positions within the UTSU.

As the vote to approve the minutes was being called, members from CUPE 1281 and several students, including Amanda Harvey-Sánchez, an incoming board member, and Andre Fast, who ran for UTSU President with the We the Students slate began chanting and shouting down the vote. Amidst shouts of “Shame!” and “Support our workers!” the motion was passed and immediately after, a motion to adjourn was brought forward and passed.

Just before the minutes of the Services Committee were to be debated, Mathias Memmel, VP Internal and Services and UTSU president-elect, brought forward a motion to call for orders of the day, which would have effectively made the items non-debatable and the allotted time for debate for the items have passed. He cited time pressures as the UTSU only booked the room until 9:00 p.m.

Various people raised issues with the motion, many making points of personal privileges and points of orders to argue against the proposed lack of debate. Eventually Memmel relented and brought forward a motion to extend debate on the minutes of the Services Committee to 10 minutes.

Susan Froom, who is the Vice-President Internal of the Association of Part-time Undergraduate Students, spoke first, saying that UTSU members had been coming to the APUS office asking about the the recent change in health insurance providers that was made last year. Froom says that they refer these students the UTSU Health and Dental Coordinator and warns that cutting this service would result in “a lot of dissatisfied students and [the UTSU] may be creating tension this year between APUS and UTSU.”

Orion Keresztesi, President of CUPE 1281, urged the board to reconsider cutting the positions.

“I want us all to remember that we’re talking about folks’ livelihoods here,” Keresztesi said at the meeting. He also said that “the people moving this motion are trying to be clever,” adding that “[the UTSU is] trying to frame this as a layoff, when they know very well it is not a layoff… it’s an attempt at a backdoor firing.”

A motion was also called to extend time to Nour Alideeb, President of the University of Toronto Mississauga Students’ Union (UTMSU), to speak on the Services Committee minutes, but the motion failed.

Today’s meeting, I think, could have gone in a different way had people not had previously made up their minds, who were willing to listen to people’s perspectives,” said Alideeb. “It’s hard when it comes to things like this because we’re not only talking about the service itself but we’re also talking about people’s lives.”

Protests continued after the meeting was adjourned as the UTSU directors left.

The Varsity is awaiting comment from Memmel, who declined to comment in-person and requested that The Varsity reach out via email. The paper has also reached out to UTSU President Jasmine Wong Denike.

This story is developing. More to follow.

—With files from Kaitlyn Simpson and Tom Yun

Clarification: An earlier version of the article stated that Memmel motioned to limit debate to zero hours. Although this is how Graydon described the motion, the article has been amended to clarify that the motion was for orders of the day.

White noise and public representation do not mix

Cassandra Williams’ actions at the U of T Rally for Free Speech are inappropriate for a UTSU executive

White noise and public representation do not mix

At the Rally for Free Speech on October 11, UTSU’s Vice-President, University Affairs Cassandra Williams suppressed the free speech of the students she is supposed to represent. The rally was meant to promote freedom of speech in the U of T community and in society at large. Anyone was allowed to take the microphone and speak their mind. The organizers strove to ensure no opinion was silenced, and that whoever spoke was heard without disruption.

However, some individuals, including Williams, used speaker systems to blast very loud white noise while people were speaking. Not only was the sound unappealing, it became difficult, or sometimes impossible, to hear what people were saying. Organizers asked for the noise to stop, but Williams and other anti-rally protesters sat on the speakers, preventing anyone who wanted to shut off the sound from doing so.

The hypocrisy of Williams’ actions was evident after considering that she helped out one week earlier at a different rally, when a group of students came together to give out “basic 101 information about trans folks and non-binary folks,” as she explained. Anyone who spoke at that rally was heard without any disruption close to what she imposed at the Free Speech rally. Photo and video evidence of the Free Speech rally showed Williams at one point publicly communicating her opinions to Professor Jordan Peterson, a promoter of and speaker at the rally, while later playing white noise when Peterson spoke out to promote freedom of speech.

Free speech is not only a fundamental right granted to us by the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, but also central to student life at the University of Toronto. The university’s Statement on Freedom of Speech states that the members of the school have “the right to examine, question, investigate, speculate, and comment on any issue,” and to “criticize the University and society at large.” It further states that the University “should not limit that debate by preordaining conclusions, or punishing or inhibiting the reasonable exercise of free speech.”

Anti-rally protestors cannot argue that the dialogue was ‘unreasonable’ if they shut down speech before any voices are even heard. By creating an environment where we cannot hear the opinions of the members of our community, the actions of the protestors inhibited the ability for free speech to be exercised at the university.

Most importantly, as a member of the UTSU executive team, Williams’ role on campus is different from that of any other student. She is paid just under $30,000 a year from mandatory fees by over 50,000 undergraduate students. Her mandate as Vice-President of University Affairs includes representing all students, and being highly involved in the Academic and Student Rights Commission. These students did not pay fees to have one of their most important rights stifled on campus. The fact that Williams is a public official, paid from students’ fees, and making such a drastic statement against a large portion of the student body calls the legitimacy of these actions into question.

Consequently, many students have realized that what she did was not appropriate for a public official that is supposed to represent them, and went online to voice their concerns. Facebook posts condemning Williams’ actions were posted, and the video showing her taking part in creating the noise became one of the top Reddit posts of all time in the U of T subreddit. Calls to impeach Williams were even made on social media, and a petition to this effect garnered over 300 signatures.

In comparison, Williams has remained relatively silent. Her only public statement on the matter thus far was in an article in The Medium, where she explained that it was “noise-music,” and not white noise, as if this excused her actions. The UTSU, in turn, has yet to make any public statement about her actions. When asked directly about her actions, her thoughts on the calls for impeachment, or whether she would consider resigning, for the purpose of this article, Williams did not comment.

A member of a student government should not take part in disrupting reasonable discourse. Student politicians do not have executive power over the students they serve, and they are given a salary not to oversee or impose restrictions on the student body, but to fulfill their duties and responsibilities in line with the university community.

Of course, student officials have their own beliefs and opinions, but raising those above the thoughts of the students they claim to represent, and acting as if those ideas are not as important, is unacceptable, indefensible, and not what student governance is about. If the UTSU purports to represent the student body as a whole, Williams’ actions at the rally greatly failed to promote that mission.

Robert Tran is a third-year student at New College studying Geography.

Op-ed: Why risk arrest?

Canada’s youth won’t stand for Kinder Morgan, and it’s time for the government to listen up

Op-ed: Why risk arrest?

When I was 12 years old, I wrote a speech about climate change for a primary school speaking contest. Unfortunately, as I would soon learn, it takes a lot more than giving a speech to move governments. For the next eight years, impassioned by the same goals, I wrote petitions, signed letters, attended rallies and marches, and spoke up at climate town halls. I have used every available traditional forum to voice my concerns, and yet the politicians that are supposed to protect my future have consistently failed to take necessary action on climate change.

When an opportunity presented itself to take my demands to the next level, I took it. For the past two months I have recruited students and youth for Climate101, a civil disobedience action calling on Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to reject the Kinder Morgan pipeline. Last Monday, that action culminated in 99 young people being arrested on Parliament Hill — the largest act of youth-led climate civil disobedience in Canadian history.

Opposing Kinder Morgan is a matter of climate justice. As students, many of us with experience in fossil fuel divestment campaigns, we know that expanding the tar sands means trampling on the rights of people across Canada and around the world. Canada made commitments in Paris last year to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees, but if Kinder Morgan and other tar sands pipelines are built, we will be on track to use up almost one quarter of the world’s remaining carbon budget. Approving Kinder Morgan means standing by as small island nations are drowned, people die of famine, and increasingly prevalent and dangerous natural disasters destroy communities.

If Prime Minister Justin Trudeau approves Kinder Morgan, he will also be breaking his campaign promise to respect the rights of Indigenous peoples. Cedar Parker-George of the Tslei-Waututh First Nation, one of the youth speakers at the action on Monday, says it best: “Justin Trudeau promised to listen to Indigenous communities. Well, my community has been pretty clear; reject this pipeline and protect the water, the land and the climate.” Tslei-Waututh and other members of Indigenous communities protecting the land are protecting their right to survive, and we need to stand with them.

Young people took action on Monday because the stakes are high, and because it just might make the difference. We know that when young people come together, we are powerful. For instance, the fossil fuel divestment movement, led by students, has collectively led to $3.4 trillion in assets being divested thus far. In the United States in 2014, dozens of youth were arrested outside the White House protesting the Keystone XL pipeline. A year later, after dozens of other actions and fierce opposition from Indigenous peoples, Obama rejected the pipeline.

Climate 101, similarly, drew on the power of young voices to influence change. Last election, 45 per cent of people aged 18–25 voted Liberal and helped along the formation of a majority Liberal government. That same demographic, spanning all the way up to 35, is overwhelmingly opposed to pipelines and supports strong climate action and respect for Indigenous rights.

Those of us arrested on Parliament Monday came with a plea, but also a warning: if Trudeau wants the support of millennials next election, he needs to reject Kinder Morgan. Perhaps seeing 99 youth arrested on his doorstep will be the tipping point he needs to make that decision.

Amanda Harvey-Sanchez is a third-year student at Trinity College studying Environmental Studies, Social Cultural Anthropology, and Equity Studies. She was one of three youth organizers working on recruitment and planning for Climate 101 with 350.org.

Letter of solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux

U of T students, faculty, and staff support protesters, condemn the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline

Editor’s note: The following is a letter of solidarity signed by over 160 University of Toronto students, faculty, and staff, expressing support for the Standing Rock Sioux and other groups protesting against the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. The letter was sent to The Varsity on October 12, 2016. 

This statement was written prior to the court ruling on September 19, 2016, which halted construction for 20 miles on either side of Lake Oahe. Protests have continued in response to the construction still ongoing at other locations across the pipeline route.


 

As members of the University of Toronto community, we, the undersigned, express our resolute solidarity with the Standing Rock Sioux and all land and water defenders at the Sacred Stone Camp against the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL).

The DAPL is one of the largest pipelines currently under construction, and it would transport 450,000 barrels per day of fracked oil from North Dakota to southern Illinois. The pipeline route travels through 1,800 km of land, through lakes and waterways, like the Missouri river, that provide millions with drinking water, and through sacred Indigenous sites and territories (some of which have already been destroyed). We stand in opposition to the development of oil pipelines in North Dakota and across Turtle Island – infrastructure that ignores and violates Indigenous sovereignty; that threatens the health of present and future generations and their environments; that exploits land and people for short-term capitalist profit.

Like the pipelines themselves that traverse colonial borders, we recognize that the Standing Rock struggle is part of the same fight being waged and won by Indigenous nations the world over against the dispossession, displacement, and destruction of Indigenous peoples, lands, and ways of life; that this action is part of a broader struggle against the violence of extractive activities that reflect and entrench ongoing state commitments to settler colonialism, environmental racism, and capitalist exploitation – violences equally perpetrated by the Canadian state. We oppose the Canadian government’s allocation of billions of taxpayer dollars towards the expansion of the Albertan tar sands, an industrial megaproject that carries far-reaching social, economic, and environmental consequences for people across Turtle Island, including the Standing Rock Sioux and their allies. We oppose the investments made by the Canadian oil conglomerate, Enbridge, in the DAPL project.

We celebrate and give thanks for the labour and the victories of the land and water defenders at the Sacred Stone Camp, including their efforts to gather people and build community – a show of power and determination that has secured the ruling by the Obama administration to halt construction on part of the DAPL. We add our voices and efforts to the struggle until we can guarantee full respect for Indigenous sovereignty and land rights, and ensure healthy land and water for generations to come.

In solidarity,

Maureen FitzGerald, Fellow, Mark S. Bonham Centre for Sexual Diversity Studies, University of Toronto

Nickie Van Lier, PhD student, Department of Geography & Planning, University of Toronto

Leah Montange, PhD student, Department of Geography & Planning, University of Toronto

Michael Chrobok, PhD student, Department of Geography & Planning, University of Toronto

Isabel Urrutia, PhD student, Department of Geography & Planning, University of Toronto

Robert Fajber, PhD candidate, Department of Physics, University of Toronto

Cristina Jaimungal, PhD student, Social Justice Education, University of Toronto, University of Toronto Graduate Students’ Union (UTGSU) Executive

Cindy Ka Man Lee, Masters student, Department of Geography & Planning, University of Toronto

Christopher Cully, MA candidate, Department of Social Justice Education, President, OISE Graduate Students’ Association

Brieanne Berry Crossfield, M.Ed Student, Social Justice Education, University of Toronto

Emma McClure, PhD student, Philosophy Department, University of Toronto

Mary Jean Hande, PhD Candidate, Leadership, Higher and Adult Education, OISE, University of Toronto

Cynthia Morinville, PhD student, Department of Geography & Planning, University of Toronto

Anna Shortly, MScPl student, Department of Geography & Planning, University of Toronto

Zachary Anderson, PhD Candidate, Department of Geography & Planning, University of Toronto

Jeremy Withers, PhD student, Department of Geography & Planning, University of Toronto

Justin Kong, MA Candidate, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

Phoebe Edwards, PhD student, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto

Emily A. Moorhouse, MA, Department of Social Justice Education, University of Toronto.

Anna Heffernan, MA Candidate, Centre for European, Russian and Eurasian Studies, University of Toronto

Alexander Ivovic PhD Candidate, Department of Physiology, University of Toronto

Emily Gilbert, Associate Professor, Canadian Studies Program and Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto

Deborah Cowen, Associate Professor, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto

Benjamin Patrick Butler, PhD student, Department of Geography & Planning, University of Toronto

Laura Landertinger, PhD Candidate, Department of Social Justice Education, University of Toronto

Jeff Bale, Associate Professor, Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto

Jillian Linton, MA Candidate, Department of Geography & Planning, University of Toronto

Ellyse Winter, PhD student, Department of Social Justice Education, University of Toronto

Dylan Clark, Lecturer in Anthropology, Contemporary Asian Studies, and Geography. U. of Toronto

Léa Ravensbergen, PhD Student, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto

Lauren Kepkiewicz, PhD Candidate, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto

Shane Lynn, PhD Candidate, Department of History, University of Toronto

Jocelyn Piercy, PhD Candidate, OISE, University of Toronto

Jessica Concepcion, Teacher Candidate, OISE, University of Toronto

Yukiko Tanaka, PhD Student, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

Louise Birdsell Bauer, PhD Candidate, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

Kim de Laat, PhD Candidate, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

Ambika Tenneti, PhD Candidate, Faculty of Forestry, University of Toronto

Nasim Ramezani, PhD Student, Faculty of Forestry, University of Toronto

Sarah Cappeliez, PhD Candidate, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

Noah Kenneally, PhD Candidate, Department of Social Justice Education, OISE, University of Toronto

Fernando Calderón Figueroa, PhD Student, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

Jonathan Kauenhowen, PhD Student, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

Merin Oleschuk, PhD Candidate, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

Matthew Farish, Associate Professor, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto

Katie Mazer, PhD Candidate, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto

Ximena Martinez, PhD student, Social Justice Education, University of Toronto.

Jesse Jenkinson, PhD Candidate, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto.

Anelyse Weiler, PhD Student, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

Andrew Merrill, PhD Student, Department of Geography, University of Toronto

Sarah Snyder, PhD Candidate, Department of Social Justice Education, University of Toronto

Jess Clausen, PhD student, Social Justice Education, University of Toronto

Khursheed Sadat MA Student, Women and Gender Studies Institute, University of Toronto

Marie Laing, MA candidate, Department of Social Justice Education, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto

Kimberly Todd, Ph.D Student, Social Justice Education, University of Toronto

Suzanne Narain, PhD Candidate, Department of Social Justice Education, OISE, University of Toronto

Yessica Rostan, MA Student at OISE/UofT in Social Justice and Comparative International Developmental Education, Youth Worker and Community Educator

Kristy Bard, USW1998 Chief Steward, Faculty of Arts & Science, University of Toronto

Victor Barac, Ph.D., Lecturer, University of Toronto, Dept. of Anthropology

Sam Spady, PhD Candidate, Social Justice Education, University of Toronto

Storm K. Jeffers, PhD Student, Department of Sociology, University of Toronto

Diana M. Barrero, M.A student, Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto

Justin Holloway, USW1998 Steward (OISE), M.A. student, Department of Leadership, Higher and Adult Education, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto

Lora Senechal Carney, Arts, Culture and Media, UTSC

Linda Kohn, Professor, Biology Dept., UTM

Karen Dewart McEwen, PhD Student, Faculty of Information, University of Toronto

Nicole Laliberte, Assistant Professor, Department of Geography, UTM

Nhung Tuyet Tran, Associate Professor of History & Canada Research Chair, UNiversity of Toronto

Theresa Enright, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

Rosa Sarabia, Professor, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, University of Toronto

Natalie Rothman, Associate Professor, Historical and Cultural Studies, UTSC

Dana Seitler, Associate Professor, Department of English, University of Toronto

Tavleen Purewal, PhD Student, Department of English, University of Toronto

Francis Cody, Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto

Jens Hanssen, Associate Professor, Departments of History & NMC, University of Toronto

Sarah Wakefield, Associate Professor, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto

Kanishka Goonewardena, Associate Professor, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto

Kerry Parrett MA student, Department of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, University of Toronto  

Catherine Thompson-Walsh, PhD Student, School and Clinical Child Psychology, Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development, OISE, University of Toronto

Anna Ek, MA Student, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto

Angie Fazekas, PhD Student, Women and Gender Studies Institute, University of Toronto

Alex Djedovic, PhD Candidate, Institute for the History and Philosophy of Science and Technology. University of Toronto

Kajri Jain, Associate Professor, Departments of Visual Studies and Art History, University of Toronto

Jennifer Jenkins, Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto

Paul Hamel, Professor, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto

David Seitz, Lecturer, Sexual Diversity Studies, University of Toronto

Michelle Murphy, Professor, Department of History and WGSI, University of Toronto

Alejandro I. Paz, Assistant Professor, Anthropology, University of Toronto

Rena Helms-Park, Associate Professor, Linguistics/Speech Pathology, University of Toronto

Sylvia Mittler, Associate Professor, Centre for French and Linguistics, UTSC

Ron Smyth, Department of Psychology and Centre for French and Linguistics, UTSC

Jennifer Nedelsky, Faculty of Law and Department of Political Science, University of Toronto.

Ilana Newman, MI student, Faculty of Information, University of Toronto

Laura Moncion, MA student, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Toronto

Noah Ross, MA student, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Toronto

Amy Wood, PhD student, Political Science, University of Toronto

Sara Klein, MI student, Faculty of Information, University of Toronto, Irena Smith, MA Student, Women and Gender Studies

Alexandra Izgerean, MA student, School of Public Policy and Governance, University of Toronto

Kathryn Henzler, MMus student, Faculty of Music, University of Toronto

Judi McIntyre, MIRHR student, CIRHR, University of Toronto

Hoda Ebrahimi, MT Student, OISE, University of Toronto

Megan Harris, PhD Candidate, English Department, University of Toronto

Zoe David-Delves, Master’s of Global Affairs Candidate, Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto

Olivia Shortt, MMus in Instrumental Performance, Faculty of Music, University of Toronto

Napat Malathum, MMSt student, Faculty of Information, University of Toronto

Mohammad Alhaj, MD. DLSPH -Department of Epidemiology, University of Toronto.

Bogdan Smarandache, PhD Candidate, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Toronto

Nisha Toomey, PhD Student, Social Justice Education, OISE, University of Toronto

Bhavani Raman, Associate Professor, Department of History, University of Toronto.

Maria-Saroja Ponnambalam, MA student, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto

Lauren Maxine, MI student, Faculty of Information, University of Toronto

Andrew Kaufman, PhD Student, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto

Evan Miller, PhD Student, Department of Mathematics, University of Toronto

Katherine D. Balasingham, PhD Student, Department of Physical and Environmental Science, University of Toronto

Alison Traub, MASc Student, Department of Chemical Engineering & Applied Chemistry, University of Toronto

Holly Pelvin, PhD Candidate, Centre for Criminology and Sociolegal Studies, University of Toronto

Sarah Dungan, PhD Candidate, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto

Talha Khan, MSc Candidate, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto

Milan Ilnyckyj, PhD Student, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

Una Creedon-Carey, PhD Student, Department of English, University of Toronto

Patrick Lorenzo, MSW Student, Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto

Rebecca Jacobs, MA Student, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto

Nicholas Field, PhD Student, Department for the Study of Religion, University of Toronto

Fatima Altaf, MA Student, Department of Political Science, University of Toronto

Madelaine C. Cahuas, PhD Candidate, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto

Heather Hanwell, MSC PhD – MPH (Epidemiology) Candidate, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto

Elizabeth Davis, PhD student, Department of Social Justice Education, OISE, University of Toronto

Peige Desjarlais, PhD Student, Department of Social Justice Education, OISE, University of Toronto

Angela Michener, MSW Student, Factor-Inwentash Faculty of Social Work, University of Toronto

Christopher Wai, MMSt  (Museum Studies) Student, Faculty of Information (iSchool), University of Toronto

Christopher Boccia, MSc student, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto

Camille-Mary Sharp, PhD Student, Faculty of Information, University of Toronto

Neil Nunn, PhD Student, Department of Geography and Planning, University of Toronto

Shaniqwa Thomas, M.ed Student, Department of Social Justice Education, University of Toronto
Alison McAvella, MT, Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Learning

Madison Stirling, MMSt (Museum Studies) Student, Faculty of Information (iSchool), University of

Toronto

Celina Carter, RN, Doctoral Student, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto

Andrea Meeson, Research Education Coordinator, Collaborative Program in Resuscitation Sciences, University of Toronto.

Dominique Soutiere, PhD candidate, Department of Physics, University of Toronto

Nicole Stradiotto, MI student, Faculty of Information, University of Toronto

Tania Ruiz-Chapman, PhD Student, Department of Social Justice Education, University of Toronto

Shanelle Henry, MA Student, Applied Psychology & Human Development, University of

Toronto OISE

Paul Matthews, MA Student, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto

James A. McNamara, MT student, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto

Ben Losman, MEd Student, Social Justice Education, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education,

University of Toronto
Kaylee Cameron, MA Student, Adult Education & Community Development, Ontario Institute for

Studies in Education, University of Toronto

David Helps, MA Student, Department of History, University of Toronto

Lila Platt, MA Student, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto

Dr. Giselle Gos, Celtic Studies, University of Toronto

Tadhg Morris, PhD Candidate, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Toronto

Shea Sinnott, MEd Student, Adult Education & Community Development, Ontario Institute for Studies

in Education, University of Toronto

MattheW Badali, PhD Candidate, Department of Physics, University of Toronto

Iehnhotonkwas Bonnie Jane Maracle, Aboriginal Learning Strategist, First Nations House, University

of Toronto

Nishant Singh, PhD Student, Department of Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto

Brent Wood, Lecturer, Department of English and Drama, University of Toronto at Mississauga

Raina Loxley, MPH Candidate, Epidemiology, DLSPH, University of Toronto

Alberto Garcia-Raboso, Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Mathematics, University of Toronto

Ann Wilkin, M.A. English, University of Toronto and M.Ed. Curriculum Studies and Teacher

Development, OISE

Tim Wesson, M.Ed student LHAE, OISE

Emily Clare, PhD Student, Linguistics Department, University of Toronto

Linda McNenly, PhD, Visiting Scholar, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto

Mississauga

Justin Stein, PhD Candidate and Course Instructor, Department for the Study of Religion, University of
Toronto

Shayne A. P. Dahl, PhD Student, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto

Rastko Cvekic, PhD Candidate, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto

Jessica Broe-Vayda, PhD Student, Department of Anthropology, University of Toronto

Vasuki Shanmuganathan, PhD Candidate, Department of German and Women & Gender Studies, University of Toronto