Undergraduate research opportunities take learning beyond classroom

Research opportunities abound for U of T’s undergraduates

Undergraduate research opportunities take learning beyond classroom

As a science student, it can be easy to forget where all of the theories and equations encountered in class come from. The long days of trial-and-error, of running experiments, and of chance discoveries can be hidden by the passage of lecture slides. Going behind the curtain and participating in the actual research process can be extremely rewarding for an undergraduate student; thankfully, a research-intensive university provides many opportunities to do so.

WILLIAM AHN/THE VARSITY

WILLIAM AHN/THE VARSITY

Participating in an undergraduate research project is an early opportunity to be exposed to the inner workings of your chosen field. An “early opportunity where an undergrad can be exposed to research in the lab, outside the classroom, would be a good experience to understand more what [the field] is,” said Armando Marquez, undergraduate counsellor of the Department of Chemistry, “and possibly develop that interest so that … students would continue and do research, go to graduate studies, do a lot more research down the line.”

It can be hard to know if a research career is right for you unless you try it, and the wide range of opportunities at the University of Toronto make undergraduate years the perfect time to give it a whirl.

The experience can certainly boost a resume. “When students get involved with this, it gives them a better opportunity as an experience, that when they go out, when they finish their education here, it makes them a very competitive person when they do apply to graduate studies or work,” said Marquez.

Research InfoYet even if you decide to apply to work in industry, professional school, or change fields entirely, a summer or semester spent doing research provides benefits that will stay with you for years to come.

Some of these wide-ranging benefits are detailed in a document by the Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology (LMP) department, and include gaining important lab skills, learning how to design an experiment, critically analyzing data, and communicating results. Students gain a deeper understanding of course material and will also have a wide-range of work opportunities after graduation. These important skills can also be taken back to the classroom.

Not only can research enhance scientific knowledge, it can also contribute to one’s personal development. “One of the opportunities for the students who get involved in research is that they are able to network with the grad students [and] with the faculty, and are given the opportunity to do presentations,” said Marquez, adding that, “students who go through this develop a more critical way of thinking instead of just what is fed to you in the classroom.”

Ishita Aggarwal, campus ambassador for the pan-discipline Undergraduate Awards program, pointed out that doing research can affect your world view. “When you participate in research, even at the undergraduate level, you really are able to better interpret claims that are made, not only in the academic setting, but also in popular media and everyday life,” she said. “I think it’s really important not only to be a producer of research, but also to be a better consumer of research.”

U of T offers a wide variety of opportunities for undergraduates to do research, including the second-year Research Opportunity Program (ROP) courses and summer research positions aimed at second- and third-year students. Each department awards positions differently:some require an application to the department as a first step, whiles others require the interested student to email potential supervisors before applying.

In the Department of Chemistry, students submit a résumé, cover letter, and application to the department before the supervisor selection process. “The competition is so fierce that we could probably have between 150 to 200 applications for an average of 25 positions,” said Marquez, who then insisted that he encourages all students to apply, as even the application process is beneficial to them. By applying, he says, students learn how to present themselves professionally on paper, an important post-graduation skill.

If one application is not successful, students should remain positive and keep looking, even if that means investigating opportunities outside of U of T ­— Toronto’s hospital system is a great place to start, for example.

According to Aggarwal, persistence is key: “One of the things that really prevents undergrads from getting involved in research is that they don’t know how and they’re just too scared … the key is not to get discouraged … if you keep attempting to contact the people whose research you’re genuinely interested in, eventually you’ll hear an affirmative answer. But you need to keep trying.”

Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson awarded Dunlap Prize

“Sexiest Astrophysicist Alive” to visit U of T in March 2014

Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson awarded Dunlap Prize

Dr. Neil deGrasse Tyson has won the first Dunlap Prize from the University of Toronto’s Dunlap Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics. According to the institute, the prize recognizes those who embody “the institute’s vision for sharing scientific discovery with the public, training the next generation of astronomers, and developing innovative astronomical instrumentation to enable breakthroughs in observational research.” Tyson’s impressive career and academic achievements easily distinguish him as a renowned astrophysicist, but these factors alone did not earn him the Dunlap prize, nor did his reputation as the “Sexiest Astrophysicist Alive.” The award also recognizes his role in scientific outreach and education.

WILLIAM AHN/THE VARSITY

WILLIAM AHN/THE VARSITY

Tyson is the current director of the Hayden Planetarium in the America Museum of Natural History, located in New York. As an astrophysicist,  Tyson has followed an exceptional academic path: he earned his BA in physics at Harvard and a PhD in astrophysics at Columbia. He also completed his post-doctoral research at Princeton. He was twice recruited by former President George W. Bush to serve on White House commissions, and was part of the NASA advisory council from 2005 – 2008.

Born in the same week that NASA became operational, Tyson became fascinated with astrophysics on his very first visit to the Hayden Planetarium at the age of nine. “The universe called me,” he said during a conversation with Stephen Colbert. Now, as director, he has been tirelessly pushing public education of science and inspiring the young generation to explore space.

Dr. Tyson has authored multiple books, including Death By Black Hole: And Other Cosmic Quandaries, an anthology of his most popular essays in Natural History magazine, and The Pluto Files: The Rise And Fall of America’s Favourite Planet — an analysis of Pluto’s cultural impact as well as a collection of public responses to Pluto’s demotion. The latter is especially fitting, as Tyson took part in the decision to “downgrade” Pluto. In his most recent book, Space Chronicles: Facing the Ultimate Frontier, Tyson not only provides a well-documented list of NASA’s contributions to our society and daily life, but also calls for greater recognition and expansion of the space program.

Tyson’s efforts in educating and inspiring the public can also be reflected in his radio show, StarTalk. The weekly show explores a wide variety of topics, scientific and non-scientific alike, and analyzes them from a scientific perspective. Past topics include dark matter, time travel, zombie apocalypses and hip-hop. Tyson’s humour, together with the expertise of guest co-hosts, keeps the show entertaining and lighthearted, yet informative and scientifically accurate. He has also collaborated with many well-known names ­— like Richard Dawkins, Stephen Colbert, and Bill Nye  ­— to discuss science topics and encourage students to keep pursuing their dreams in science.

His witty and sometimes sarcastic style has gathered him a dedicated audience not only in universities but also online; his twitter account, followed by nearly 1.5 million people, is composed of fun facts, interesting thought experiments, scientific reviews of sci-fi movies, and other humorous quirky comments. In 2014, he will also be the host of Cosmos, a continuation of the legendary science show first popularized by Carl Sagan.

Tyson’s immense popularity has earned him 18 honorary doctorates, a NASA Distinguished Public Service Medal and an asteroid named in his honour (Asteroid “13123 Tyson”). On March 21, 2014, Tyson will visit at U of T for the Dunlap Prize ceremony and give a free public lecture in Convocation Hall. Registration for this event will be available later this winter.

 

With Files from the Dunlap Institute, Hayden Planetarium, and Colbert interview with Neil DeGrasse Tyson at Montclair Kimberley Academy.

Living Arts: Cooking with 2 Chainz

“My stove deserve a shout-out, I’m like: “What up, stove?”

Living Arts: Cooking with 2 Chainz

“I smoked a blunt for dinner, another blunt for breakfast,” boasts Taulheed Epps, a hip-hop artist better known as 2 Chainz on his new album, B.O.A.T.S. II #METIME. While 2 Chainz implies that this breakfast is a satisfactory meal for him, it’s clear that he is too much of a foodie not to pair his blunts with some high quality seafood.

CookingW2Chainz

WILLIAM AHN/THE VARSITY

The album is accompanied by a cookbook entitled #MEALTIME. Besides gold chains and hashtags, 2 Chainz has a penchant for kale and heirloom tomatoes. The recipes were created in collaboration with Chef Aleem, an upcoming celebrity cook from Atlanta who went on tour with 2 Chainz.

I decided to have some #METIME myself and try out the recipes, mostly because I was feeling #hungry.

The cookbook opens with an advisory introduction: “2 Chainz doesn’t write down his music, it flows naturally from his mind. Follow 2 Chainz and feel free to freestyle your cooking… Remember: embrace mistakes, and always cook within your comfort zone. #TRU.”

I began by making sautéed asparagus. The instructions begin with putting on “an Adidas sweatsuit, Chainz N Thangs.” I don’t own these things, but I did my best with what I had: Roots sweatpants and some gold necklaces. Then I played the mandated track, “Mainstream Ratchet.”

The recipe is relatively simple and takes about two and a half rounds of “Mainstream Ratchet” to cook. The last instruction is to “vibe out” to the song. I contemplate the lyric: “I’m real, you ain’t, calamari, crab cakes,” which seems to suggest that calamari is more authentic than crab, yet 2 Chainz has a recipe for crab cakes in his cookbook. Assuming he’s referring to artificial crab, I digress to the “Me Time” sauce.

The sauce is tricky, because it requires you to go to the mall and spend “a handful of racks” on a new outfit for the night, get a manicure and pedicure, and spend some “me time” at home catching up on seasons of The Wire. The sauce itself is quite simple, and feels personal, as 2 Chainz is revealing his favourite recipe, which he suggests pairing it with almost all of the others. It’s delicious, even without a full commitment to its instructions. I assume that when Chainz suggested getting a new outfit for the night, he was not talking about a sweater from The Gap, but that’s what I bought for my “me time” meal. I didn’t get a manicure or pedicure, but I did make my roommate paint my nails while we watched clips from The Wire on YouTube.

The recipe for mashed potatoes begins with the reasonable advice to remove your four-finger ring, if wearing one, and set it aside before beginning­ — I was not (but normally would be, of course). This recipe is a bit more time-consuming, but smells amazing all the way through, and is broken up in the middle by the instruction:“…play “Feds Watching” and celebrate the good times you had this year,” before adding the sour cream and parsley to the potatoes. You’re supposed to serve the mashed potatoes in a gold bowl, which I did not have. “Feds Watching” continued my speculation of 2 Chainz’ abhorrence for imitation crab meat with the line: “I’m raw, talking California rolls,” since raw seems to refer to genuine crab meat rather than the fake stuff.

2ChainzBluntDin

WILLIAM AHN/THE VARSITY

For the mixed seafood kebabs, you are meant to invite your friends over for a cook out, telling them that “2 Chainz is firing up the grill.” That would, however, be a lie — and I cannot afford to feed all my friends seafood, so I ignored this rule. The recipe itself is really good — like the other recipes, it is surprisingly simple, flavorful, and healthy, and pairs quite well with a nice helping of “Me Time” sauce.

The food is actually really good and the album is consistent with the promised theme of “me time.” A highlight is the end of “I Do It” featuring Drake and Lil Wayne, a gospel celebration of taking time to yourself. 2 Chainz is preaching to do so by making some delectable eats. Surprisingly, I was genuinely inspired by the 2 Chainz cooking experience.

At the end of the meal, I get to cleaning the kitchen to the sounds of “Fork.” In the wise words of 2 Chainz: “I’m ballin like Mr. Clean, I gotta keep my kitchen clean.”

Ingenuity and endurance at UofTHacks’ marathon

Canada’s largest student hackathon brings creative coding, insomnia

Ingenuity and endurance at UofTHacks’ marathon

Over 300 programmers camped out in the University of Toronto’s Bahen Centre for Information Technology on the September 28–29 weekend to participate in the Computer Science Student Union’s first-ever coding marathon, or “hackathon.” Participants, working either individually or as members of a team, were given 36 hours to design and code a unique project, and competed for prestigious prizes donated by the event’s sponsors.

StorifyThrow

On 11:30 pm on Friday evening, about 150 programmers have already arrived at Bahen; the rest will arrive early Saturday morning. The hackathon officially started at 9:30 pm, which means that these participants have already had a couple of hours to work on their projects. In some cases, this means learning a new language or  software framework from scratch­ — no one here is afraid of tackling something unfamiliar and difficult.

Audun Bjørnurd Mo and Kamyar Ghasemipour, for instance, are both second-year computer science students at U of T. Neither has ever participated in a hackathon before and, like many participants, they’re relatively new to programming. In fact, Audun acknowledges that “the biggest hurdle for both of us is probably that we’re both lower-level students.” They met on arrival and decided to team up; after spending the last couple of hours brainstorming ideas, they think they have a project. Kamyar happened to bring along a Kinect — a motion sensor for Microsoft’s Xbox ­— and they came up with the idea of designing a website using voice and motion commands. Ideally, they will be able to stand in front of the motion sensor, tell the computer what they want on a webpage, point to where they want it, and then simply gesture with a hand to “stick” it to the webpage. It’s ambitious and they know it, especially since Kamyar is going to have to learn a new programming language in order to do it.

Over 300 programmers gathered for the hackathon at the Bahen Centre. TREVOR KOROLL/THE VARSITY

Over 300 programmers gathered for the hackathon at the Bahen Centre. TREVOR KOROLL/THE VARSITY

Meanwhile, Ben Cohen, a veteran of four hackathons, says the biggest challenge is always staying focused for such a long time. His solution: “Work on something interesting that you like… If it’s interesting, you’ll want to come back.”

His own project certainly qualifies. Ben attends the Rochester Institute of Technology, where one of the constituent colleges is the National Technical Institute for the Deaf. This means that about 10 per cent of the students on his campus are either deaf or hearing impaired. After three years at RIT, Ben has picked up the basics of American Sign Language (ASL), but many of his classmates haven’t. Although he has never worked with images before, he plans to create an app that will recognize and interpret finger spelling. The app will aid communication between the deaf community and the hearing community.

Ben Cohen works on his ASL to English translator. TREVOR KOROLL/THE VARSITY

Ben Cohen works on his ASL to English translator. TREVOR KOROLL/THE VARSITY

After a full night of work, Saturday offers coders the chance to take a short break from their projects and drop by the tech expo, where they can meet with recruiters and mentors from leading companies, and attend a series of lectures. One of these lectures is a fascinating talk by lawyer Rosy Rumpal, a specialist in working with new start-ups, on the legal aspects of creating a new business. The tech expo is a great way for students to meet potential employers, as recruitment is one of the main reasons companies choose to sponsor an event like UofTHacks. As Jeff Shin, a design mentor for the competition and a representative of sponsor OneClass, says: “An event like this makes people stand out… There are a lot of students who really focus on school but don’t partake in extracurriculars… It really sets [the participants] apart.” Matt Helm, a Javascript developer from Shopify, the event’s biggest sponsor, confirms: “We want to find the top developers, even if they’re still in school.”

There is certainly no shortage of outstanding coding on display in the final Hack Expo on Sunday morning, or in the final presentations Sunday afternoon.

Two hackers work on their projects through the night. TREVOR KOROLL/THE VARSITY

Two hackers work on their projects through the night. TREVOR KOROLL/THE VARSITY

There is Automatic ROSI, an app that will automatically check ROSI for you after waitlists have been removed. There is Dynamit, which will merge your entire online social life into one feed. NeatChore, created by five U of T exchange students from Brazil, keeps track of roommates’ or housemates’ chores and awards points to the most helpful contributors. There is Audun and Kamyar’s project, Kinect, which wins the prize for “Most Innovative Hack.” The two are overjoyed and astonished; 36 hours before, they could never have predicted this.

A panel of four judges determines the top three overall; individual sponsors have also offered specific category prizes. One of the most lauded projects is bananasundae.com, a website designed to help students find recipes quickly and easily based on the available ingredients. Type in the ingredients you have in your fridge, and Banana Sundae will promptly return a list of recipes that you can make with those ingredients­ — which can be sorted by popularity, price, and preparation time. The creators of the website, Will Lau and Vahe Khachikyan, walk away with no less than three separate prizes, including second place overall. Ben Cohen’s English to ASL translator places third, and the top prize goes to Cryptr, an app that will allow you to encrypt information or files and send them securely via email.

The hackathon laster 36 hours. TREVOR KOROLL/THE VARSITY

The hackathon laster 36 hours. TREVOR KOROLL/THE VARSITY

Each team shares one thing in common: they all have identified a specific need or a specific problem, and put all of their creativity, ingenuity, and perseverance towards creating a solution. It is not programming for the sake of programming. The projects of UofTHacks showcase the potential of code: the  future of technology is in the hands of the hackers.

The art of being Bowie

Latest exhibit at the AGO is a thematic trip through the musician's influences, career, and life

The art of being Bowie

Walking up the steps to the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO), I wasn’t sure what I’d find. David Bowie has all the ingredients of a fascinating exhibit, celebrating a man my father deemed “the original Lady Gaga.” I can recall us going through old album covers together, his eyes sparkling as his brain relived the rebellion and recklessness of his youth.

I was intrigued. I wanted to know what kind of person could do that to someone ­— what lit that spark.

MEDIA PHOTO

MEDIA PHOTO

From the moment I put on the exhibit’s interactive, intuitive headphones (they respond as you travel from section to section — no more pushing buttons), a theatrical hum filled my ears, as if to immerse me into Bowie’s mind. The exhibit itself is sectioned off into various rooms in order of influence, age, and era. It was here, taking the first few steps, where I began to see where my father’s adoration came from. Bowie, a trendsetter from the moment of inception, seemed to always be searching for something bigger. At one point debating the idea of full-fledged Buddhism, he declared his goal was to become a “trendy person, rather than a trend.”

In a world peppered with Internet celebrities, child stars, and reality television, Bowie couldn’t be more right. That’s one aspect which struck me as I walked from room to room — Bowie’s vulnerability. Sure, he may look like an alien, with his unique eyes and bone structure holding court from miles away. He may be very different indeed — yet he holds the same desire for originality, fighting the same demons many of us face in life. When asked about his reason for acquiring such fame, Bowie was recorded saying, simply: “I wanted to be well-known. I wanted to turn people on to new things.”

MEDIA PHOTO

MEDIA PHOTO

Bowie’s endured failure, rose above it, and countered bowing down to the masses by creating a new world with new identities to dominate. Whether he is Bowie or Ziggy Stardust, by claiming to be somebody else he could be himself. In a time when rock and roll was raw and rugged, Bowie would add Kabuki-inspired makeup, vague, embellished wording, and costumes that continue to shape the styles of today. He saw inspiration and influence in everything, and whether you follow him or not, Bowie shaped us.

His big break occurred during the moon landing of July 1969, when the BBC aired his single, “Space Oddity” alongside the miraculous footage. It seems that on that day, two things skyrocketed into our living rooms: the moon and, perhaps, the man whose mind resided there.

Bowie lived for creation in all forms, citing A Clockwork Orange and 1984 as major literary influences. Between music videos, songs, and performances, he refused to exist within a single dimension. The plethora of costumes and drawings shown in the exhibit provide a peek into what rock used to be — a time when individuality was the only option, and social networking had nothing to do with posting a “selfie” on Instagram. Things were either brutally honest or brutally ethereal — you couldn’t claim one as the other.

bowie6

MEDIA PHOTO

In the exhibit, a few things resonated with me. Bowie had a fondness for a program called the Verbasizer, which took paragraphs, sentences, and bits of news and scrambled then into new phrases. Sometimes, these compilations would speak to him such that it enabled him to write a song, full of lyrics with meaning for the listener. That is the beauty of Bowie, his words are vehicles that take you somewhere untravelled.

I could write pages on Bowie’s impact on our generation, on his androgynous style and the importance of celebrating it. I could devote paragraphs to the beauty in his layered music, his synthesized beats and cultural trailblazing. But I won’t, because I want you to experience it for yourself. Find refuge in David Bowie’s fantasy, find comfort in his life.

His world is your world, and I strongly advise that you inhabit it.

“David Bowie is” is running now until November 27 at the AGO.

Painting turns competitive with Art Battle

Artists battle it out in a series of painting contests held around Canada

Painting turns competitive with Art Battle

Art isn’t something we often think of as a competition, however, that’s exactly what Simon Plashkes and his partner Chris Pemberton created when they founded Art Battle in 2009. Art Battle is a seasonal program that hosts monthly events in cities across Canada. Eight artists are selected to compete, and they are given 20 minutes to create a painting using only a blank canvas, acrylic paint, and brushes. Event attendees circle the painters as they work, thus immersing themselves in the experience of the artistic process. At the end of the round, the audience votes for their favourite painting and a silent auction is held to sell the individual works. Painters who are successful in the individual Art Battles are eligible to participate in the national championship held in July.

The first event of Art Battle’s fifth season took place this past Tuesday September 24 at the Great Hall on Queen Street West. The night featured 16 artists who competed in two intense rounds, creating surprisingly complex works in the short 20-minute time frame. Plashkes explained to The Varsity, “We get dozens of applications per week… Ultimately this is entertainment, so we try and cultivate the best artists who range from, I think our youngest was 17, to people in their late sixties. There’s such a wealth of talent.” When asked about his inspiration when creating the Art Battle program, Plashkes explained: “Art often involves such a passive-aggressive kind of competition, we thought we would bring that to the surface and see what happened.” Plashkes and Pemberton hosted a few Art Battles in 2009, and the response was so great that he and his partner expanded the program until it was a national competition spanning every province and territory.

Sarah Crawley, a U of T student, speaks of her experience as a second time Art Battle participant: “I feel like this is exactly the kind of feedback that artists need but are scared to get, and being able to see how your work holds up to an audience is really important” she said. Crawley said she’s grateful for the opportunity to work on her art, since it can sometimes be hard to find an artistic community in university. Sarah was the only U of T student to participate in this year’s Art Battle event, and she competed against a whole host of other artists, including the 2012 and 2013 Art Battle champion, Yared Nigussu.  The event was packed with Torontonians sipping drinks from the cash bar and enjoying the DJ’s music. When it was time for the battle to start, Pemberton led a crowd-wide countdown, and then the artists began their feverish painting. Artist Nora House was the eventual champion, winning a $250 cash prize, and the paintings were auctioned off for as much as $2100. Art Battle is moving to Ottawa next before returning to Toronto in July for the annual championships.

Living Arts: Getting published in Urban Dictionary

An honourable pursuit, not a total waste of time

Living Arts: Getting published in Urban Dictionary

This past summer, a friend of mine was engaged in a casual relationship with a rather philosophical and balding Middle Eastern man. He had the demeanour of Woody Allen and could often be found watching lengthy foreign films or meandering around obscure art exhibits.

One evening, he called her to come over to his place at quite a late hour, leading us to believe that this was most certainly a “booty call.” She excitedly skipped over to his apartment, prepared for a lovely unexpected romp. Once there, however, he explained that he had called her because he had just watched a six-hour Hungarian documentary, and expressed the need to share his thoughts on it with someone.

This prompted me to coin the term “snooty call.”

Convinced this was a brilliant addition to the canon of English colloquialisms, I decided to submit a formal definition of it to Urban Dictionary so that the world could share in its usage:

 

Snooty Call

n. Alternative to “booty call”; a late night call from a lover for the purpose of intellectual conversation (rather than sexual relations).

Eg. He called me at 2am to come over and discuss a six-hour Hungarian documentary he watched — such a snooty call.

 

Shortly after submitting my entry, I received an email of rejection. I was appalled, obviously, but accepted the rejection as a challenge to continue my efforts of getting a word into the dictionary.

When I looked further into how words actually get into the dictionary, I found out that the process operates by public vote. I then became an Urban Dictionary editor myself (a very credible resume item) and started voting on different definitions. I voted for the inclusion of “mewp,” a noun referring to throwing up in one’s mouth, and “on the same banana peel,” an alternative to “on the same page” with the alternative meaning of “being bad at Mario Kart.” I rejected “blanch,” a verb meaning “to throw up,” brought to you by the same person who came up with “mewp,” which offered the example, “At first I thought I was only going to mewp, but then I totally blanched.”

I also researched what sorts of words make it into Urban Dictionary. It seemed that there are two categories for what gets published on this bastion of human intelligence: either extremely silly and stupid ideas, or clever but ultimately stupid ideas. “Farte Blanche” was added on August 24, meaning “permission to fart freely,” exemplifying the second group.

In discussion with Science Editor, Katie Vogan, she encouraged me to try once again with the term “snooty call.” She felt it had potential. We adjusted the definition using the principles of virality to appeal to the lowest common denominator. In other words, we dumbed it down:

Notice the elimination of details and capital letters. We simplified the definition and example for mass relatability, and tried to make the example less seemingly “stuck-up.” We also changed the specificity of the initial example to achieve broader appeal. After a few minutes of tense waiting, our experiment paid off, and I received an email notifying me that “snooty call” was published in Urban Dictionary. You can now purchase mugs, t-shirts, and mouse pads featuring my original term and its accompanying definition, with the official Urban Dictionary logo certification on them.

It is a great honour and achievement, which I will certainly add to my resume, to have my witty turn of phrase among the ranks of “masturbathe” (touching oneself in the bathtub), “vurp” (a burp laced with vomit), and “clam jam” (“the female equivalent of cock block”), in Urban Dictionary — an infinite well of vernacular gems.

Frosh in photos

A visual recap of some of the highlights from #startUofT 2013

Frosh in photos

Frosh in photos